#40 September/October 2010

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#40: September/October 2010
On the Cover: Lyle Lovett. Photo by Michael Wilson.

FEATURES

Texas Twisters: The self-proclaimed Great State has produced unique and enduring music, but few favorite sons find the success they’re due. Why? Bob Girouard looks for answers

Les Paul at the IridiumLes Paul Mondays: He played here once a week for decades. Now guitarists the world over come to play the Iridium to honor the man who made their careers possible by Levi Davis

DEPARTMENTS

Limia MohamedLetter From an Intern: Artistry vs. gimmickry: Intern Limia Mohamed casts a steely eye on the antics of the rich and ribald, and she ain’t buying it. Neither should we

Influences: Smokey Robinson & Jimmy WebbInfluences: Enduring songs from two pens: Smokey Robinson and Jimmy Webb travel different roads from Motown to Success

Kickin’ In Your Stall: Carl Gustafson and band hire a producer to serve up a dose of harsh reality

On The Record: John Mellencamp turns in not one but two great releases. Heavy topics abound: Los Lobos talks about Trust, Dolly about Inspiration, Tom Petty on Mojo, Charlie Musselwhite on The Well, JJ Grey on a Georgia Warhorse, Alejandro Escovedo, at last, on Love

Re.Issues: Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble made history like the Normandy invasion—a brief event with long-lasting effects. Chubby Checker, Tommy James and others resurface

Sat. Night and Sun. Morning: John Kuroski peers below the surface of James Brown and Clyde McPhatter

Pet Sounds: The blues pushes to the fore every couple decades, and Ali Green sees new fans in the under-30 set

Get A Grip: Possessed of an apparently inexhaustible closet, Steve Walbridge bares more dirty secrets

What’d I Say: Jim Hynes profiles five distinct sounds that earn a place on our map

Also Appearing: Bonnaroo bands offer Melissa Caruso advice on surviving the road; Pornographers, a Potter, a Miller and others perform live, while Williamsburg, Wellmont and Winery provide more stages

Collecting: Get a toehold on the Lone Star State. Arnie Goodman collects Texas artists, and finds a lot more than yee-haw

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